The Claydon Opti-Till® System, is a holistic approach to crop establishment which delivers consistent, high yielding crops at low cost, providing maximum profitability.

At the centre of Opti-Till® Seed Drilling System is the Claydon direct strip Hybrid drill, with its unique leading tine technology.

HOW DOES THE CLAYDON LEADING TINE CONCEPT WORK?
The Claydon leading tine moves the optimum amount of soil, but only where it’s needed – in the seeding and rooting zone. It creates tilth and drainage, aerating the soil and alleviating compaction. The perfect growing environment is created for fast germination. The soil between the seeded bands is left undisturbed and moisture is conserved for the plants to tap into. The undisturbed banks of soil support the weight of farm traffic, minimising the damage caused by wheelings and compaction.

The front tine has been designed to drill direct into stubble, but can also be used in plough and min-till scenarios. It works on heavy clay and light sandy soils, baked out ground and wetter soils. It is this front tine that helps make the Claydon Hybrid drill so versatile. And as extreme weather events demonstrate, when conditions make it difficult for other drills, crops can be established with a Claydon Hybrid drill.

THE DESIGN CONCEPT IN PRACTICE
Centrally mounted depth wheels give accurate seed placement as they run on undisturbed soil between the rows and do not run over or cap the seeded area. Stone protected leading tines have a breakout force of 600kg. This is more than twice that of many other direct drills. It allows the Hybrid drill to break through the ground, lifting and aerating it whilst creating a drainage tract and space for the roots to grow deep and strong with ease. The tungsten-carbide plated leading front tine moves just enough soil to create the perfect growing environment in the seeding and rooting zone. Its depth can be adjusted between 0 for low disturbance and 15cm for deep-rooting crops.Robust, sprung seeding tines maintain constant seed depth, flowing through the soil lifted by the leading tines and cultivating it whilst only moving for a large stone. Adjustment is via the depth wheels for seeding as shallow or deep as necessary.The seeding boot drops the seed in the tilth created by the leading and seeding tineConsolidating rear toolbar with a variety of options to suit all soil conditions

 

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Tell us how you are improving your soils. Share useful resources, organisations and initiatives.

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Good soil structure is vital for optimising water and nutrient use efficiency; and for sustaining profitable cropping systems. Poor soil structure and compaction can reduce yields, restrict access for field operations, increase fuel use and, for high value root and vegetable crops, increase reliance on irrigation. Where there are clear signs of soil compaction, cultivations to remove the compaction may result in a yield benefit. Visual soil assessment is important to assess the extent and depth of compaction and to inform decisions on the most appropriate course of action.  

YEN Zero is a recently established network in the ADAS YEN Family, with the overarching aim of creating a net-zero community. It aims to bring key players from across the agricultural industry together to meet the industry’s target of achieving net zero emissions by 2040.

Oilseed Rape is the most widely grown break crop in the UK. The seed is crushed to produce vegetable oil and the remaining rapeseed meal is a high protein animal feed. 

The intricate web of relationships between physical, chemical and biological soil components underpins crop and livestock health and productivity. Protecting soil health is also critical to environmental sustainability, as soils: • Exchange gases, such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, with the atmosphere • Regulate the flow of water and rainfall in the water cycle • Provide nutrients for plant growth, by breaking down organic matter and altering chemical fertilisers • Transform and store organic materials, as part of the terrestrial carbon cycle • Degrade contaminants applied through human activities or left by floods and aerial deposition A healthy soil is able to sustain, in the long term, these important functions. In a healthy soil, the interactions between chemistry (pH, nutrients and contaminants), physics (soil structure and water balance) and biology (including earthworms, microbes and plant roots) are optimised for the conditions in that place.   View more from AHDB GREAT Soils. Share resources you find helpful below.

There is a lot of interest in soil carbon currently, due to the opportunity to store and sequester carbon in soil. It is also vital for soil health, forming part of soil organic matter.

Help us collate the knowledge sources, organisations and initiatives out there that are seeking to improve the farmed environment

Soil organic matter (OM) is all living or once-living materials in the soil.  OM provides a direct source of energy/food for many soil organisms: it is the fuel in the soil food web.  Turnover of OM successively releases and immobilises elements vital to the nutrition of crops. 

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Wheat is the mostly wide grown crop in the UK. Nationally yields average around 8 t/ha/

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