yellow rust

Cereal diseases affecting wheat, barley, oats, rye, triticale and maize can be caused by a variety of factors, including fungal, bacterial or viral infections, pests and insects, and environmental stress.

Cereal diseases can reduce crop yields and lower the quality of the harvested grains, leading to economic losses for farmers. To prevent and control cereal diseases, farmers can use a combination of cultural practices, such as crop rotation and sowing date, and chemical treatments, such as fungicides and insecticides. It is also important for farmers to monitor their crops regularly for signs of disease and to promptly implement control measures when necessary.

This summary was written by OpenAI's ChatGPT - If you can do better please Join and Edit the page.

Related Organisations

Content below is from across the PEP community and is not necessarily endorsed by Stewards or by PEP

Connected Content

Integrated Pest Management highlights the growth of a healthy crop with the least possible disruption to agro-ecosystems and encourages natural pest control mechanisms. IPM is one of the tools for low-pesticide-input pest management, and IPM must now be implemented by all professional agchem users.

The British Society for Plant Pathology (BSPP) was founded in 1981 for the study and advancement of plant pathology.

Puccinia triticina is specific to wheat. Other pathotypes can affect barley, rye and triticale. 

Commonly known as Septoria or Septoria leaf blotch, this is the most damaging foliar disease in the UK for Winter Wheat. With a carefully constructed fungicide programme and use of Integrated Pest Management (IPM), disease pressure can be managed and losses greatly reduced.  

Diseases infect susceptible plant hosts, where environmental conditions favor disease development. Infected crops achieve lower yields and the quality of the produce can also be affected.

Yellow rust is an important economic disease of wheat. Often occurring more in the east of the UK and areas with mild winters and cool, damp summer weather. A good selection of resistant varieties and well-timed chemical applications can provide effective control of the disease and minimise losses.

Crop protection refers to practices and measures employed in agriculture to safeguard crops from both biotic (pests, diseases and weeds) and abiotic (environmental factors) stresses. They key goal of crop production is to maintain crop productivity, health and quality whilst minimising yield losses.

Leading arable event The CropTec Show is returning to the East of England Showground in Peterborough on November 23 and 24. Now in its 10th year, the event will deliver the well-loved CropTec formula combining industry-leading exhibitors, the latest machinery and technology, networking and discussion opportunities as well as valuable updates on developments across the arable sector.    Tickets are free and available now by registering at www.croptecshow.com.

The IPM Decisions project will create an online platform that is easy to use for the monitoring and management of pests. Access the platform now at https://platform.ipmdecisions.net/  

Ramularia (Ramularia collo-cygni) is a disease that affects only winter and spring barley. 

Triticale is a cross between wheat and rye. It has been shown to be a high yielding relatively low input crop that can do well in second cereal and less fertile conditions, but its adoption is hampered by lack of a reliable consistent market.

Crown rust (Puccinia coronata) is a fungus that is specific to oats. 

Leaf Spot (Pyrenophora avenae) is specific to oats. 

Net blotch of barley (causal pathogens: Pyrenophora teres f. sp. teres (Net form); P. teres f.sp. maculata (spot form). Net blotch affects a wide range of grasses, however, the forms on barley are specific to that crop and do not affect other crops. 

Rhynchosporium (Leaf Blotch or Scald) affects barley, rye and triticale. 

Guide published by BASF and AHDB, written with ADAS & Rothamsted, providing a complete reference book for cereal diseases. 

The AHDB Recommended List is part of the fabric of arable farming and is the engine drivi

Fungicides are a type of agrochemical used specifically to kill fungal pathogens or inhibit the growth of fungi and the spores that they produce. They full under the umbrella of plant protection products (PPPs), also referred to as pesticides, along with other agrochemicals such as herbicides and insecticides that target weeds and insect pests respectively.  Prior to the development of fungicides, there are many historic cases of pathogenic fungi devastating crop yields - one of the most famous being the Irish Potato famine of 1845-52. This was caused by the potato late blight fungal pathogen Phytophthora infestans which today still causes massive losses to agriculture globally, although management by fungicides is now an important component of control.  A wide variety of fungicides exist with various modes of action (MOAs) to effectively control many fungal diseases including mildews, rusts, blights and leaf spots. A threat to modern agriculture is the development and spread of resistance to such fungicides amongst fungal populations.

BASF are running a series of 3 short technical webinars, bringing together experts and industry specialists. We`ll be discussing barley and wheat disease control, but also nitrogen efficiency and return on investments.

Corteva is a global R&D focused agribusiness

Ergot is a fungus that grows on rye, triticale, wheat and barley, and to a lesser extent, oats. It also affects a wide range of grasses, particularly blackgrass. Although the disease has a relatively small effect on yield, ergots contain large amounts of toxic alkaloids that can pose a pose a risk to animal and human health.

RAGT varieties with BYDV resistance are branded Genserus

The Defra Pest and Disease survey has been running for approximately 50 years and monitors endemic pests and diseases in winter wheat and winter oilseed rape, along with accompanying information about agronomic practice and pesticide inputs to the crop.

Take-all is a root disease caused by the soil dwelling ascomycete fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. The fungus is capable of infecting cereal crops such a wheat, barley, triticale and rye however, oats are immune. Take-all can also affect several common grasses such as couch grass and bromes. Another variety of take-all fungus (graminis var. avenae) can infect oats and other cereals, but this is currently very rare in the UK.

A new variety selection tool has just been released by AHDB and provides a dynamic way of lookin

Ergot is a fungus that grows on rye, triticale, wheat and barley, and to a lesser extent, oats. I

Our guidance covers major and minor diseases that affect wheat, barley, oats, rye and triticale. (AHDB)

ADAMA’s prothioconazole fungicide, SORATEL, uses a unique formulation to offer improved disease c

Write whatever you want here - this is the main section. You can add links, add pictures and embed videos. To paste text from elsewhere use CTRL+Shift+V to paste without formatting. Add videos by selecting 'Full HTML' below, copying the 'embed html' from the source page (eg Youtube), clicking 'Source' above and pasting where you want the video to appear.
You can upload an image here. It can be jpg, jpeg, gif or png format.
Upload requirements

You can upload a file here, such as a pdf report, or MS Office documents, Excel spreadsheet or Powerpoint Slides.

Upload requirements
Authors Order
Add Authors here - you can only add them if they already exist on PEP. Just start writing their name then select to add it. To add multiple authors click the 'Add another item' button below.

Please ensure that you have proof-read your content. Pages are not edited further once submitted and will go live immediately.