Protein report by Table

The history of protein, from its 'discovery' and naming in 1838, is a story weaving science, nutritional politics, cultural attitudes to food, and much more. An understanding of this history is invaluable if we are to contextualise the current focus on protein that characterises discourses about health and sustainable food systems, and popular beliefs about fitness and nutrition. In this piece, Tamsin Blaxter and Tara Garnett from Table trace the history of protein from 1838 through to the end of the 'Protein fiasco' in 1974, discovering many echoes of the modern day.

Protein has a singularly prominent place in discussions about food. It symbolises fitness, strength and masculinity, motherhood and care. It is the preferred macronutrient of affluence and education, the mark of a conscientious diet in wealthy countries and of wealth and success elsewhere. Through its association with livestock it stands for pastoral beauty and tradition. It is the high-tech food of science fiction, and in discussions of changing agricultural systems it is the pivotal nutrient around which good and bad futures revolve.  There is no denying that we need protein and that engaging with how we produce and consume it is a crucial part of our response to the environmental crises.

But discussions of these issues are affected by their cultural context—shaped by the power of protein. Given this, we argue that it is vital to map that cultural power and understand its origins. This paper explores the history of nutritional science and international development in the Global North with a focus on describing how protein gained its cultural meanings. Starting in the first half of the 19th century and running until the mid-1970s, it covers two previous periods when protein rose to singular prominence in food discourse: in the nutritional science of the late-19th century, and in international development in the post-war era. Many parallels emerge, both between these two eras and in comparison with the present day. We hope that this will help to illuminate where and why the symbolism and story of protein outpace the science—and so feed more nuanced dialogue about the future of food.

Related Organisations

Connected Content

A combination of sustainability, health & animal welfare concerns are pushing a shift away from meat in our diets to alternative proteins.

This Topic doesn't yet have a Stewarded summary, but connected groups, content and organisations show below. Click the 'Ask to Join' button if you would like to be a Steward for this Topic and provide a summary of current knowledge and recommend useful resources, organisations, networks and projects. "Like" this Topic if you would like to see it prioritised for providing a wikipedia style summary.

TABLE is a global platform for knowledge synthesis, for reflective, critical thinking and for inclusive dialogue on debates about the future of food.

This Topic doesn't yet have a Stewarded summary, but connected groups, content and organisations show below. Click the 'Ask to Join' button if you would like to be a Steward for this Topic and provide a summary of current knowledge and recommend useful resources, organisations, networks and projects. "Like" this Topic if you would like to see it prioritised for providing a wikipedia style summary.   Branston are creating a potato derived protein product.