landscape

Arable crops in the UK make up just under half of the farmed area (3.9M ha out of 9M ha)

The major arable crops grown in the UK are wheat (1.6M ha), barley (0.8M ha), oilseed rape (0.3M ha), beans (0.18M ha), oats (0.16M ha), potatoes (0.1M ha), sugar beet (0.1M ha) and peas (0.06M ha), given by Defra Statistics

Information on arable crops is generated and provided by AHDB for Cereals & Oilseeds, by PGRO for beans & peas, and by BBRO for sugar beet. Agronomy advice is provided by independent and commercial agronomists.

 

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Pulses are leguminous crops harvested for dry protein-rich seed, with peas (pisum sativum) and beans (vicia faba) being the major crops in the UK.

The major commodity crops in the UK are wheat, barley, oilseed rape, field beans, sugar beet and potatoes, but around half of agricultural land grows grass.   

Leading arable event The CropTec Show is returning to the East of England Showground in Peterborough on November 23 and 24. Now in its 10th year, the event will deliver the well-loved CropTec formula combining industry-leading exhibitors, the latest machinery and technology, networking and discussion opportunities as well as valuable updates on developments across the arable sector.    Tickets are free and available now by registering at www.croptecshow.com.

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Oilseed Rape is the most widely grown break crop in the UK. The seed is crushed to produce vegetable oil and the remaining rapeseed meal is a high protein animal feed. 

Precision farming involves the use of GPS, sensing and control technologies to use spatial data to manage soils, crops and livestock. 

AHDB Guide from 2021 incorporating WRAG guidelines. Weed control is vital for high yields of good-quality crops and to prevent the spread of pests and diseases, e.g. ergot. Yet with fewer active ingredients, a need to protect water and manage herbicide resistance, the weed challenge must be managed across the rotation.

White Horse Energy have secured funding from Department of Energy Security and Net Zero as part of the Biomass Feedstocks Innovation Programme to develop a transportable pelletising technology. This will be deployed at farm level with the capability of processing agricultural residues and perennial energy crops into industrial standard biomass pellets. This produces a high-density renewable energy source, for which the demand is growing substantially because of the need to find alternatives to fossil fuels. A prototype of the mobile pelletiser is currently being developed ready to enter the market. White Horse Energy hopes to provide farmers with an opportunity to increase farm revenue, all year round, without interfering with existing operations.  Due to a lack of domestic production, current UK demand for biomass feedstocks significantly outweighs available supply. Therefore, a large proportion of biomass material is currently imported, which limits the sustainable nature of this energy source. White Horse Energy’s innovation will increase the viability of UK production and provide farmers with the opportunity to diversify into a new UK market, with lower environmental impacts and input costs. White Horse Energy are keen to engage with farmers during this development stage to understand the issues and concerns within the agricultural industry that affect growers most. This engagement assists in shaping the project to provide a diversification option that contributes positively to both the environment and farm income. Ultimately producing a solution that meets a wide variety of needs for everyone.

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Spring barley, as opposed to winter barley, is planted in the spring and harvested in the summer or early autumn.

Wheat is the most widly grown crop in the UK. Nationally yields average around 8 t/ha/

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Environment Digest is a quarterly publication that provides a synopsis of recent news, reports and other materials that are of interest to the farming community. With a particular focus on how agriculture links with the environment, each issue focusses on articles across sustainable food production, climate change, water and waste management, soils and biodiversity. Environment Digest principally focuses on stories and policy changes that are relevant to England and/or the UK with a slant towards the arable sector.

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