beans

Pulses are leguminous crops harvested for dry protein-rich seed, with peas (pisum sativum) and beans (vicia faba) being the major crops in the UK.

The PGRO website is the best source of information for growing pulses in the UK. See the online Pulse Agronomy Guide at https://www.pgro.org/pulse-agronomy-guide/ 

Spring combining peas are very versatile with most current varieties being semi-leafless with high yields and improved standing ability. While heavy rainfall and wind in June and July can result in tall crops that are prone to lodging, growing peas on lighter soils reduces lodging risk. The tolerance of peas to drought stress allows good yields in low rainfall areas. Spring peas mature early enough to allow production as far north as central Scotland.

Winter field beans are the classic pulse crop for heavier land that is difficult to work in the spring. Though the preferred method of establishment is by drilling, ploughing-in remains an option. Early crop development reduces their susceptibility to early summer drought.

Spring field bean yields can fluctuate with the success of the crop linked to early summer rainfall. In dry years, yields can be disappointing, but in wet years much
better results can be expected. Vulnerability to drought can be reduced by growing on more moisture-retentive soils and by sowing early. Spring beans are now being successfully produced in arable areas of Northumberland and southern Scotland with good yields. In these higher rainfall areas, the late maturity of spring beans needs to be considered and early maturing types are now available. Premium markets exist for pale hilum beans for export to the Middle East for human consumption and for small, round-seeded samples for pigeon feed.

Other protein-rich dried pulse crops can also present opportunities for growers, including Soya, Navy Beans and Lupins.

 

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Great article on innovations in pulses from Future of Food Production at https://btpubs.co.uk/publication/?i=765176&p=52&view=issueViewer

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A combination of sustainability, health & animal welfare concerns are pushing a shift away from meat in our diets to alternative proteins.

Bruchus rufimanus is a widespread pest of beans. Adults are 3.5 - 4.5 mm long, squat shaped, black or dark-bown with small grey flecks

Some symbiotic or free-living microorganisms can fix inert di-nitrogen (N) from the air into reactive organic nitrogenous compounds.  Most biological N fixation (BNF) in farming systems occurs in the root nodules of legumes where rhizobium bacteria take photosynthates from the plant in exchange for fixing atmospheric N and returning ammonium or amides which the plant uses to form amino acids, proteins, etc.   Plants need more N than any other nutrient and N commonly limits plant growth in many ecosystems. 

Legume is the commonly used name for the family of flowering plants, Fabaceae. Any plant in the Fabaceae family that has leaves, stems and pods are referred to as a Legume.

PULSES, GRAINS, FLOUR & MORE FROM BRITISH FARMS

George Eustice has announced that there willl be £12.5M made available for research and developme

A roadmap for the future of the alternative protein sector in the UK.  

As the UK's centre of excellence for peas and beans, the PGRO has a long and highly valued track record of providing authoritative, up to date information and project work based on solid, reliable research.

Arable crops in the UK make up just under half of the farmed area (3.9M ha out of 9M ha)

This Topic doesn't yet have a Stewarded summary, but connected groups, content and organisations show below. Click the 'Ask to Join' button if you would like to be a Steward for this Topic and provide a summary of current knowledge and recommend useful resources, organisations, networks and projects. "Like" this Topic if you would like to see it prioritised for providing a wikipedia style summary.

Field beans (vicia faba) are a widely grown break crop across the UK on around 170,000 ha. 

Peas (pisum sativum) are grown either for combining dry seed (combining peas) or harvesting fresh as a vegetable or for freezing (vining peas).

PGRO have conducted trials testing a range of biostimulants on spring beans, vining peas and combining peas in seasons from 2018 to 2021.

Understanding how to drive performance of pea crops, by sharing measurements, experiences and ideas

Following the TRUE and LegValue EU projects this LinkedIn group with over 100 members continues to share resources for those interested in legume crops,

It’s worth reflecting on why we export most of the pulse crop we produce in the UK, or simply fee

Understanding and improving bean yields by sharing measures and ideas  

This Topic doesn't yet have a Stewarded summary, but connected groups, content and organisations show below. Click the 'Ask to Join' button if you would like to be a Steward for this Topic and provide a summary of current knowledge and recommend useful resources, organisations, networks and projects. "Like" this Topic if you would like to see it prioritised for providing a wikipedia style summary.   Branston are creating a potato derived protein product.

At present, we are leaders in the spring field bean market, including varieties such as Lynx, Vertigo, Fanfare and newer varieties including Yukon, Macho and Victus. We also have competitive oilseed rape varieties, for example Clubroot resistant varieties Crome and Croozer, HEAR OSR varieties including Resort and Ergo, all of which help the UK farmer to maximise their yield.  

Scientia potentia est: knowledge is power. But understanding empowers. The purpose of the Legume Hub is to empower all interested in the development of legume crop production and use by providing access to validated knowledge. It is a platform dedicated to sharing knowledge and successful practices across value chains, from plant breeding, on-farm activities, through to processing and consumption.

Really insightful piece from Andrew McGuire of Washington State University:

Really useful guide from PGRO on the decisions to make when growing combining peas.

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